Energy & Heat Recovery Ventilators

Energy & Heat Recovery Ventilators

The most efficient way to provide good indoor air quality is through either an Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) or Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV). Both are able to provide fresh outdoor air while recovering the most energy possible from outgoing air.

ERV AND HRV INCENTIVES

for Commercial/Industrial new construction and existing buildings

ERV Customer Incentives

No existing ERV and not required by code
  • ≥ 55% to ≤ 64%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.00/CFM per unit
  • 65% to ≤ 74%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.25/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 75% to ≤ 84%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.50/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 85%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.75/CFM per unit
Replacement of existing ERV or new ERV required by code
  • ≥ 65% to ≤ 74%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.50/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 75% to ≤ 84%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.75/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 85%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.15/CFM per unit

Minimum $200 to maximum $8,000 per unit

HRV Customer Incentives

No existing HRV and not required by code
  • ≥ 55% to ≤ 64%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.50/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 65% to ≤ 74%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.75/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 75% to ≤ 84%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.00/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 85%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $1.25/CFM per unit
Replacement of existing HRV or new HRV required by code
  • ≥ 65% to ≤ 74%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.25/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 75% to ≤ 84%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.50/CFM per unit
  • ≥ 85%
    Sensible Heat Recovery Effectiveness
    $0.75/CFM per unit

Minimum $200 to maximum $5,000 per unit

Service Provider Incentive

  • $100 per unit

Distributor Incentive

  • $50 per unit

Equipment Eligibility

  • Incentive paid on operating CFM of the unit
  • Operating CFM of the unit must have a minimum sensible heat recovery effectiveness of 65% at 32°F
  • In-suite installations may be eligible at a different incentive level
  • Not to be used to recover energy from areas where 100% fresh air is required; no recirculation is allowed by codes or standards; contaminants (gases and vapours) could be recirculated into the breathing zone
  • Buildings with demand control ventilation (DCV) or scheduled setback are not eligible

Multi-Installation Bonus

Increase your incentives up to 40%. Our multi-installation bonus is an additional incentive for eligible energy-efficient equipment.* A minimum of 4 units is required and can be installed in one or more locations. Your maximum bonus payment can be as much as $20,000 per account holder.

20% bonus
for any combination of
4-10 units
30% bonus
for any combination of
11-20 units
40% bonus
for any combination of
21-30 units

Participants must pay the natural gas bill for the location where the equipment was installed. The following equipment is ineligible for the bonus: demand control ventilation, ozone laundry equipment, multi-unit residential in-suite installations and custom engineering projects.

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Apply for Equipment Incentives

The process is easy. Simply complete the online application. After you submit it, a Union Gas Account Manager will contact you within 5 business days to review your application and discuss next steps.

More Information About ERVs and HRVs

An HRV is a ventilation system that uses a counter-flow heat exchanger between the inbound and exhaust airstreams of a building to provide fresh air and controlled ventilation.

An ERV combines this ventilation system with the ability to transfer temperature and humidity in and out of a building.

Energy & Heat Recovery Ventilators illustration

How ERVs and HRVs Work

An HRV is similar to a balanced ventilation system; however, an HRV uses the exhaust air from a building to either preheat or precool the incoming fresh air. An HRV typically features two fans—one to remove the air from within a building and one to bring in fresh air. What separates an HRV from other ventilation systems is the heat-exchange core. The core transfers heat from the exhaust stream to the incoming stream to warm the incoming air and reduce heating costs.

Where HRV only transfers sensible heat (change in temperature), ERV is able to transfer sensible heat and latent heat (heat given off or absorbed through a process) as well. The incoming fresh air is tempered with an energy recovery core. Heat is then exchanged through the core and water vapour is transferred with a rotating wheel, allowing for the transfer of humidity as well.

Benefits

  • Lessens energy consumption and cuts operating costs by recalling heat and humidity from the exhaust air of the building
  • Improves air quality by transporting fresh air into the building
  • Betters work environment conditions by humidifying in the winter and dehumidifying in the summer
  • Helps ensure ventilation and energy recovery standards are met

Maintenance

Like any part of an HVAC system, HRV and ERV need regular maintenance. Be sure to contact your HVAC consultant or service provider to schedule routine maintenance visits.

Below is a basic outline of an HRV/ERV maintenance schedule:

  • Every 1 to 3 months: clean or replace filters, clean or unblock outside hooks and screens
  • Every 6 months: inspect and clean heat exchange core, inspect condensate drain and pans
  • Every 3 to 6 months: service and clean fans
  • Annually: clean grilles and inspect ductwork, check defrost system, balance supply and exhaust airflow

Building Applications

Every building needs ventilation to bring in fresh air, remove poor quality air and control moisture. Due to these needs, most buildings are required to have a mechanical ventilation system to supply air from outside to the inside of the building.

Choosing between HRV and ERV requires careful consideration of climate and other factors that affect indoor humidity levels. Building factors, such as the presence of a continuous vapour barrier, tight air sealing and closed combustion, can also increase humidity. In cold climates, high indoor humidity levels can be most effectively controlled in the winter using HRV. However, for buildings that suffer from low humidity levels in the winter, an ERV is often a better choice. An ERV should also be chosen if it will be used frequently to ventilate an air-conditioned building in the summer.

To ensure an HRV/ERV system fits your building needs, contact an HVAC or engineering consultant. The consultant will assist in balancing the system and verifying flow to all the pickup points, as well as ensuring proper application (sizing, location of inlets and outlets and zone control).

Looking for a Trusted Service Provider?

These qualified professionals are experienced with Union Gas programs. They are ready to help you assess the best energy-efficient equipment solutions for your business.

Find a Professional

Have Questions About Our Incentive Programs?

Locate an Account Manager in your area or email us your questions and we'll respond within 5 business days.

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