Education

We have much to learn from, and about, each other

Pow wow event

We have much to learn from, and about, each other

We have much to learn from, and about, each other

Pow wow event

We have much to learn from, and about, each other

Understanding, knowledge and education are investments worth making, whether we're diving more deeply into the history, culture and rights of Indigenous peoples, or supporting First Nation and Métis students.

Learning never stops. On National Indigenous Peoples Day 2018, we were joined by a number of Indigenous leaders at our offices across Ontario, including Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) President Margaret Froh, who led a lunch and learn session in Toronto.

Employee learning about Métis history

In October 2018, 30 people from across our company met at our Milton office to learn about our commitments to Indigenous procurement, consultation, and hiring practices. Jennifer Parkinson, president of the Grand River Métis Council, shared some information on Métis history.

Knowledge requires tools. That's why we've donated 150 refurbished laptops and tablets to Indigenous schools and communities. And through an annual book drive, we've supplied over 52,000 books to Indigenous communities.


Considering a skilled trade? We've supported the Skills Canada—Ontario First Nation, Métis and Inuit Initiatives program since 2012. Our grant supports three First Nations, Métis, and Inuit liaison officers.

What's it like to work with us? Our "Day in the Life of a Utility Service Rep" is a one-day session for Indigenous youth. To sign up, contact the Niagara Peninsula Aboriginal Area Management Board or Grand River Employment and Training.

A member of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation? We support an ongoing annual bursary program for Aamjiwnaang post-secondary students to offset a portion of the financial costs of post-secondary education.

Hear Tracey Aultman talk about her experience as a Métis Student Intern, and her impressions of our company culture and workforce.
Wendy Landry, our Manager of Indigenous Affairs, makes a passionate case for why learning about the past is an important part of shaping the future.
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